Mother’s Day on COVID-19 lockdown in the Philippines

Happy Mother’s Day! Especially to Tedly’s mom Diane, here in the Philippines with us, and my mom back in New York.

I miss my mom. It’s been more than two years since I’ve seen her. A lot has happened in those years. She and my dad are never too far from my thoughts. My folks live roughly 60 miles from New York City. Thankfully, things seem to be getting better around there – if you can call 300 deaths a day ‘better’.

Every day (or almost every day), I text my parents in the morning. We are 12 hours ahead of New York. Today was no different.

I spent some much needed time catching up on email today. Did some back-end blog work. Swept again. Hand-washed more towels again.

And a first: for the first time, I cut a pineapple.

It’s kind of a running joke about my nonexistent kitchen abilities. I’m pretty much useless at trying to cook. I guess I could do it if I followed directions. But I don’t ever really have to with Tedly around. I can make eggs and toast, and I used to have a great juicer. I can saute some veggies, and pour milk over cereal. Super basic stuff.

Tedly teased that I made a mess in the kitchen with my pineapple; that I didn’t have to gouge the pineapple eyes so badly. I think my first effort was fine. The pineapple tastes the same, even if it doesn’t ‘look’ pretty.

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And I had fun. I sucked and gnawed on the core like it was a corn cob, and it was fantastic! Juices ran over my lips and down my chin and arms, and I didn’t care. I love pineapple.

Mother’s Day brunch

For Mother’s Day on COVID-19 lockdown, Tedly couldn’t take Mom Diane out for brunch, so he brought it to her!

On the menu: scrambled eggs, pancakes with chocolate syrup, hot dogs (sausage substitute), potatoes and corned beef, fresh fruit salad of oranges, watermelon, and my cut pineapple.

Tedly made it all with basic supplies. He’s getting good at that. Oh – and I teased him about the huge mess he made in the kitchen.

Earlier in the week, when we went on a supply run, we bought Mom Diane a few pairs of shorts and a fun T-shirt, because it’s getting hotter and she needed some shorts. The clerk wrapped up the goods in paper, so it was almost like opening a normal gift.

Where does the time go?

After brunch, I took in the towels off the drying line, and looked out at the sea. I decided to take a couple of hours to myself at a spot on the beach I have really grown fond of. The tide was going out, the sun was blazing, and I craved some time alone.

I collected shells for the roof at our apartment. Went for a swim. Sloshed in the low tide water with my feet and watched various sea creatures. Repeat.

Alone time was over as the sun got lower and locals came out to the beach for low tide fishing and beach combing. Filipino people will openly approach strangers. They are direct, and always interested in visitors.

I chatted with an 18-year-old young lady who wanted to practice her English. We had a good conversation – at least 10 full minutes with social distancing observed.

Another brief conversation 10 feet apart was with a young man from the Bay Area who’s staying here with family. He worked for a health insurance company back in the U.S., and he plans to go back, eventually.

Back at home base at the Hangout Beach Resort, I worked on our newsletter, video called my mom to say Happy Mother’s Day – literally half a world away. It was 8:00 p.m. here, 8:00 a.m. there.

Now, the neighborhood has settled into quiet, the sky is still dark because the moon rises later, and I’m amazed another day is already gone.

Thanks for reading, “Mother’s Day on COVID-19 lockdown in the Philippines.”

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Mother’s Day on COVID-19 lockdown in the Philippines

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