Lazy lockdown Sunday in Malay, Philippines

It was a lazy lockdown Sunday for me around our apartment in the Philippines. In fact, I’ve had such a lazy weekend, I never left the apartment. Anyone else in the same boat?

Fresh pineapple

I had a pile of juicy, ripe pineapple for breakfast. Cut up by Mom Diane. It’s become my favorite fruit while on lockdown. It’s so sweet! I hope you still have access to fresh fruit.

A piece of bread with peanut butter and a hard-boiled egg with a few cups of coffee also helped start me off today. No need for meat.

I keep reading about the meat trouble back home, along with stories about dairy shortages. It’s tough to believe the headlines I read. This one was from Bloomberg News the other day: U.S. Reels Toward Meat Shortages and the World May Be Next. Yikes.

Social communication

Also this morning, Mom Diane and I talked with her two daughters back in America, my sisters-in-law Mary and her husband, Dave, and Tina. It was so nice to see/hear them!

This evening, the highlight of my day: seeing my sister Karen on a video call. I hadn’t seen her in a few weeks and I realized on our call just how much I miss her, and I should make more of an effort to see her every week.

I answered emails and messages. To my delight and surprise, a reader offered to help me with the ad issue on this site that I mentioned the other day.

On one hand, I’m thrilled with the help offer. On the other, I’m a bit disappointed I haven’t figured it out myself yet. It’s become my version of the old-fashioned puzzles I see American friends back home posting on social media once all the pieces create a picture.

Government communication

Also on social media, I again saw how communicative the Philippine government is on every level: federal, provincial, city, town, neighborhood. In my Facebook news feed, I saw an alert for a virtual news conference. No drama — just facts. I also see Aklan Province post to its Facebook page often.

The president releases statements and decisions about once a week. Rodrigo Duterte makes decisions, announces goals, and leads the way to his plan. From what I can see, federal, state, and local governments work together. It is impressive — especially compared to the shit show I watch from America.

I had planned to go back to the U.S.A. later this year, but who knows if that will happen now.

Visa situation

The Philippine Bureau of Immigration updates its ‘Advisory’ page as needed. It’s helpful. None of us can get to an immigration office at the moment under this Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ).

We all are here on tourist visas, but fines for overstays are waived. Our visas technically expire in a few weeks. We have 30 days to file an extension once the ECQ is lifted, should we want to stay longer.

Or, we can apply for an emigration clearance certificate (ECC) to leave the country. Tedly and I must have an ECC to leave, because we will have been here six months when our visas expire next month (mom Diane five months). The ECC takes three days to issue. It’s good for 30 days.

Related: Odd visa policies in Southeast Asia

Dinner and strange fruit

Since it was a lazy lockdown Sunday, we ordered dinner tonight from the Hangout Beach Resort’s awesome kitchen. We had chicken chop suey, one of Mom Diane’s favorites, with rice and a strange fruit for desert.

It’s the top plate pictured above: guyabano — also known as: soursop.

Interestingly, after dinner, I discovered it’s native to the Americas and the Caribbean – but we never had it while there.

It tastes … different.

From Wikipedia:

With an aroma similar to pineapple, the flavor of the fruit has been described as a combination of strawberries and apple with sour citrus flavor notes, contrasting with an underlying thick creamy texture reminiscent of banana.

Even on lockdown we get the chance to experience new things. That’s pretty cool.

Thanks for reading, “Lazy lockdown Sunday in Malay, Philippines.”

What to read next:

Ellen and Tedly alternate blog updates each day during the lockdown. Check back daily for new updates!

Lazy lockdown Sunday in Malay, Philippines

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